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Sunday, June 1st, 2014SUGGEST NEWS

Google gets 12,000 requests to be 'forgotten' on first day
Posted by: Nebuchadnezzar on June 1st, 2014 @ 12:41AM

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COMMENTS (6) | GOOGLE | DIGG
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BlueFalcon
Word To Your Mom

June 1st, 2014 @ 5:29AM

Registered:
2003-04-27
Location:
Filth-a-delphia
Posts: 1560
This European Court ruling is unbelievable. I saw it last week and I'm surprised there wasn't more commentary on this site about it. Basically, some Spanish guy didn't like some unflattering information about him from 16 years ago being public, and now Google has to restrict said information's ability to be searched? That's a really dangerous precedent. What is the criteria used to determine what can be searched and what remains hidden? Can politicians now have their past missteps flushed down the memory hole? What about a swindler with prior fraud convictions? Is he now free to shed himself of his criminal past so he can perpetrate his confidence schemes on a new set of victims? There is no bottom to this rabbit hole.
BiVRiP
General

June 1st, 2014 @ 8:41AM

Registered:
2003-05-11
Location:
Canada
Posts: 2345
I'll play devil's advocate.

The unflattering information about that Spanish guy was about his home being repossessed. It doesn't say why, but I'd argue that unless there was some criminal aspect involved, it's really no ones business.

Now say he goes to apply for a job. Depending on the job, HR departments are always looking for creative ways to cull the application pool. They do a search on the guy and they find out his house was repossessed. Let the inferences begin...he doesn't know how to manage his money; he's a bad father who can't take care of his family; he's unreliable and not dependable. In short it appears he wouldn't "fit in" and consequently he's a candidate not worth pursuing.

Is it wrong to make these assumptions? Yup. Does it happen? More than most people realize. Now through no fault of his own this guy has missed out on a job opportunity simply because something about his private life is out in the wild and even if it's factually correct, it's outdated/misleading/irrelevant/insert adjective of choice.

I'll throw in a personal example. I just googled my name. I'm very protective of my online footprint. I was surprised to see that one of the results that come up involves a link to a presentation for a piece of software I was testing for internal use at the company I currently work for. I'm not happy. I did not publish this material. I did not authorize the software company to make this information available. I was not notified this presentation is now publicly accessible. The account in question is tied to my work email. Had I left the company, it would be a pain in the ass to get it taken down/removed. There's nothing vulger or embarrassing or generally unprofessional involved. But again there are inferences that can be made that could either now or in the future come back to bite me. For example, one could walk away believing that I support/endorse the product in question (I don't).

What about if you were wrongly accused of an egregious act but no charges were ever filed and it was proved that the accusing party had an axe to grind and made everything up? Should that lie follow you around the rest of life potentially costing you friends, family and career opportunities?

Yes, it's a Pandora's box that is ripe for abuse. I don't know what the guidelines/rules are to take your information down. I would think that criminal records and stuff you've voluntarily made available to social networking sites would be exempt from being removed. But in an age where no matter how vigilant you are about what you say and do, that certain private information can be accessible even without your knowledge or consent...well maybe it's not that bad of an idea to have some mechanism in place to purge or limit said information from prying public eyes.
Gamelore
Marine

June 1st, 2014 @ 9:41AM

Registered:
2003-04-04
Location:
San Jose, CA
Posts: 624
Government screwing with the open Internet is never a good thing.
Smokin Joe
Marine

June 1st, 2014 @ 8:55PM

Registered:
2006-06-10
Location:
The Land of Chocolate
Posts: 2784
While I'm not a fan of this, I can see this is the result of the fact that people aren't so forgiving for certain things.

It sucks to be haunted by something in your past.

The thing that bothers me is that I feel like the tool is probably 95% used by Politicians.
Hammer
General

June 2nd, 2014 @ 8:21AM

Registered:
2009-04-07
Location:
Posts: 658
The big problem is Larry Page was found scrubbing Google of anything defamatory about himself and a "hidden service" existed to do this that cost a butt ton of money.

A big problem in this world is people's pasts haunting them FOREVER. Services like Google has made this problem exponentially worse in just the last 10 years.

People have a right to privacy and it shouldn't be only the multi-millionaires who have access to this service.
Smokin Joe
Marine

June 2nd, 2014 @ 4:02PM

Registered:
2006-06-10
Location:
The Land of Chocolate
Posts: 2784
People have a right to privacy and it shouldn't be only the multi-millionaires who have access to this service.

Was anyone other than Page found using the tool?

A big problem in this world is people's pasts haunting them FOREVER. Services like Google has made this problem exponentially worse in just the last 10 years.

I'd argue that the Social era of the Internet made that happen. People dig up shit from the past all the time and while Google made it easier, it's just too easy to blow up minor details.

Quite a few folks have been raked across the coals simply because of an out-of-context quote, regardless of when it was said.

It'd be nice if folks wouldn't overreact or spend so much energy overanalyzing a couple bytes.


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